Science in Weather

Another successful meeting is in the books for the Trailmen of OR-1531.  In Oregon, especially in the spring, a sunny day can quickly turn wet.  The boys already knew from experience that before you go hiking or camping, you need to know what the
weather is going to be like. During the meeting, the Trailmen learned to look for some clues in nature that can help predict the weather.

Here are some of the clues they learned:

  • Big, billowy clouds-cumulus clouds mean that there is fine, clear weather ahead.
  • Very high clouds are called cirrus clouds or “mare’s tails.” They hint at rain or bad weather within 36 hours.
  • A circle around the moon at night foretells rain. An old proverb says, “Circle around the moon, rain or snow soon.”
  • A red sky in the morning means there may be rain. But a red sky at night tells of good weather and clear skies. The old proverb says, “Red sky at night, sailor’s delight. Red sky at morning, sailors take warning.”
  • Make a campfire. The smoke usually rises. If it blows to the side or hangs low, you might want to listen to the old proverb that says, “If smoke hangs low, you’re in for a blow.” Rain coming!
  • Walk in the grass in the morning. If grass is dry, it means that rain is coming. If it is wet, unless it rained the night before, the day will be clear.
  • Birds may stop flying and take refuge at the coast if a storm is coming.
  • Cows often will lie down and stay close together before a thunderstorm.

After some discussion, the boys learned to identify the different types of clouds Stratus (low clouds), Altostratus (middle clouds), Cirrus (high clouds), and Cumulus (clouds with vertical development) in a game show setting.

Before going into some skit and song preparation (and closing prayer), the boys read from Genesis and Hebrews and reflected on God’s gift of nature, our stewardship, and the importance of understanding the spiritual and practical lessons learned from observing nature.

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